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ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

ARCH/EOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



HIS EXALTED HIGHNESS THE NIZAM’S DOMINIONS. 




1326 F. 
1916-17X15! 



CALCUTTA 

BAPTIST MISSION PRESS 
1918 



ANNUAL. REPORT OF THE ARCH/EOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

o» 



HIS EXALTED HIGHNESS THE NIZAM’S DOMINIONS. 




ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

ARCH/EOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

OF 

HIS EXALTED HIGHNESS THE NIZAM'S DOMINIONS. 




1326 F. 
1916^7 A D. 



CALCUTTA 

BA1TIST MISSION PRESS 
19x8 




CONTENTS 



OFFICIAL NOTES 

Review of Government on the Report . . - • • • • • • • • • 

I.rtter from the Superintendent of Arch***, to the Secretory u> Government. General 
(ArchicologicaL Depnrtment 



REPORT 



I'eraonncl 

Tour* 

Conservation . . 

Excavation 
Epigraphy 
Numbmatlca . . 

Muieu w 

Hyderabad Arcbvotoglcnl Society 
Publication* . . 

Library 

Photograph* .. .. • ■ 

Drawing* and Survey Map* 

Expenditure on Conservation and 

.. Maintenance of Department 
Tour Programme for iji6 P. (IQI7-I* *•*»•) 



% 



X 

x 

I 

5 

s 

9 

9 

9 
xo 
xo 
xo 

10 
IO 
IX 
XX 



APPENDICES 

A. Superintendent'* Diary 

It. Statement of Expenditure on the Department . . 

C Conservation and Survey... 

D. IJat of Book* 

E. Photograph* 

F. „ Drawings .. 

G. Coins acquired during the year 



.. 15-16 

17 

.. 17-18 
iq-21 
22-24 
*5 

•• 25-45 




PLATK 

I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 
XIII. 



LIST OF PLATES 



Tmjt 

| ami' Unjid. BUoli; (4) at Komatur (Uedakl: (O Inscription in the Jimi‘ 

Maajid. Biloli 

(*) Tomb ol Sfaih I.otfullab. Timutni iNirmall; (4) Toll Matjid. Hyderabad. vwvr Iiotn 
8.-B. ; (r) thr mum. oplo—ada, float view. 

(d) Plan of the Toll Maajid. Hyderabad : (b) Plan of the temjJc at I’paipalb (Karim- 
nagai). 

(4) Temple at Dkfcpn*. NbdmabM. S.-R , (4) the -me. Irom S.-W. i (r) the Mme. 
from S.-W. : <d> the Mm*. W. 

(a) Na«anatha temple. Anndah (Parbhani); (4 and r) Uw Mine. Mth W B view. 

(a) Napinntha t. mple, detail ol caivin*. Northern waU ; (4) the Mine cartern wall ; 
( f ) the Mme. •ootln-rn wall : M the aamr. aouthein wall (niche). 

I XagSnatba temple. Sikhara . (4) the Mme northern doorway ; (r) Ihe aam*. pillar* 
of the portko; (d) the Mine, detail of i-U.it in hall. 

Plan of the newly diwoveted Viharat at Mahur. ififaMd. 

nibl-ka-Maqbara at Auran*abod. Front elevatloii. 

.. * 

„ „ Ground and top plana. 

Plan and section of the Anwa temple. Auraneahkd 

Coin* from mint* not repre«ented ia the cabinet* of the Lahore or Indian Museum*. 




Proceedings of the Government of His Exalted Highness the Nizam 
in the Judicial Police and General Departments— ( Archeology ) . 

No. y of 

Dated, Hyderabad (Dbccah), 2.»th Jitxe, 1918. 

SUBJECT 

Review of the Report on the working of the Arohaeologlcal Depart- 
ment for the year 1916-17 (1326 F.). 

Personnel.-- Mr. Ghulam Yazdani was in charge of the Department, as 
Superintendent, throughout the year. The term of Mr. Yazdani's first appoint- 
ment in the State expired on the 31st March, 1917 (27th Urdlhihigbt, 1326 F.), 
and ut the request of His Exalted Highness' Government the Government of 
India sanctioned the extension of his services up to the 31st March, 1920. 
Following this extension the Department, which was inaugurated as a temporary 
measure, was made |iermancut. 

The Superintendent was on privilege leave from the 6th May to the 2nd 
July, 1917 (1st Tlr to 15th Shahriwar, 1326 F.); hut as he attended to important 
work during that |>criod his absence involved no changes in the office staff. 

2 Tours . — The Superintendent's tour programme was curtailed owing to 
the epidemic of plague in some parts of the Dominions, nud for the same reason 
last year’s programme of operations was not fully carried out But the restric- 
tion of his movements enabled the Superintendent to devote greater attention to 
the monuments in Warangal, which town was comparatively free from plague. 
He also made short visits to places in the Karimnagar and Aurangabad districts. 
In 1918 the Superintendent proposes to visit places which are off the railway in 
Medak, Nizainabad, Nanded and Parbhani, and to explore the 'Adilabad district 
which has not hitherto received much attention. 

3. Consen<ation . — The Superintendent carefully examined the group of 
temples at Palampet and took tiinelv measures to protect them from further 
destruction. Mr. Yazdani thinks that this group " represents, perhaps, the 
brightest stars in the galaxy of the Mediaeval Deccan temples." The great 
temple, which stands practically as a prototype for the smaller ones, is described 
with some detail in the Report It represents what Fergusson called the Chalu- 
kyan style in the Deccan, and others, owing to a restricted knowledge of the 
extent of its prevalence, have named the Hoysala style of Mysore The inscrip- 
tions in this temple are being edited by Dr. Barnett of the British Museum and 
will be published shortly. 

Conservation work was carried out on other monuments, according to sanc- 
tioned estimates, in different parts of the Dominions. Mr. Yazdani is to submit 




viii 

to Government a note of repairs to the temple at Uparpalli (Mediaeval 
Deccan style) in the Karimnagar district, which he examined in the course of 
the year. 

The report contains a detailed description of the Toll Masjid, in the City 
on the road to Golconda. The Superintendent has proposed certain measures 
for the conservation of this beautiful little monument of Qujb Shahi archi- 
tecture. 

In the Aurangabad district the campaign of conservation started two years 
ago and has been carried on vigorously. Repairs to the Buddhist caves at 
Aurangabad and the Sivite temple at Aliwa have been completed. Sir John 
Marshall, Kt., C.I.E., Director General of Archeology in India, was consulted in 
the matter of the preservation of the AjanU paintings, and he kindly suggested 
the names of three Italian experts of “ Rcstauri"— M I.uigi Cavenaghi and 
.Professors Tito Venturini and Fabri/io I.ucanni His Exalted Highness' Govern- 
ment have requested Sir John Marshall to engage, on their behalf, the services of 
one of the three experts for a winter's work in India. 

His Exalted Highness' Government have sanctioned a sum of B.G. Rs 5,000 
for the French savant. Monsieur Fouchcr, to write a monograph on the icono- 
graphy of the Ajanta painting* The monograph, which will lie illustrated by 
the three-colour process, will be published by Government 

The preservation of tlie Eflora caves ha« l»ccn taken in hand, Rs. 8,557 
having been spent during the year out of the first sanctioned estimate for O.S. 
Rs 30,019. A second estimate for Rs. 40.000 (approximately) is before the 
Finance Department for sanction. 

4. Excavation .—In November 1916 (Adbur 1326 F.) the Superintendent 
visited the Madras Museum to study the markings on the prehistoric pottery 
collected in that Museum, and published a note on them in the Journal of the 
Hyderabad Archaeological Society. Mr. Yardani is led to the opinion that the 
great similarity in the markings points to a connection between the cnirn-buildcrs 
of South India and Scrgi's Eur-African race. 

During the year Dr. E. H. Hunt opened forty cairns in the environs of 
Hyderabad and was the fortunate discoverer of many interesting finds. 
Dr. Hunt’s pioneer work in this direction is a stimulus to other members of the 
Hyderabad Archaeological Society. One paper on the subject from his j>en has 
appeared in the Society's Journal : doubtless others will follow. 

5. Epigraphy. — Dr. Barnett's monograph on the Ratnappa and Uparpalli 
inscriptions will be issued shortly. His monograph on the Pakhal inscriptions 
will follow separately. 

Some minor Telugu inscriptions were copied at Medak and Bhainsa. 

During the year a complete set of rubbings was taken from the Golconda 
tombs and were published, with critical notes, in the 1915-16 volume of the 
Epigraphta Indo-MosUmica. Rubbings were also taken from several interesting 
Balimani and Qutb Shaln inscriptions in the Medak Fort and Biloli Masjid. 
Another inscription -relating to Khafi Khan, the historian— was copied at 
Narsapur. 




IX 

6. Numismatics.- Three hundred and ninety-seven coins were acquired as 
treasure trove. Seven of them were gold coins of the Vijayanagar dynasty, and 
there were three hundred and seventy-six Mughal silver coins, four Asaf Jahi silver 
coins and one Bahinani copper dub of the time of Humayun. Some of the Mughal 
coins are valuable as being from mints which are not represented in the cabinets 
of the Lahore or Indian Museums. These coins are for sale to public institutions 
or private collectors . or they will be exchanged with any institutions or Govern- 
ments with whom His Exalted Highness' Government are on terms of exchange. 

7. Museum. —Since the Superintendent's report was written a Curator has 
been appointed for the Museum and is proceeding to British India to study the 
methods in the principal museums there 

8. Hyderabad Archeological Society. -The Society has institute,! a gold 
medal to commemorate the memory of its Founder and first President, the late 
Sir Alexander Pinhey, K.C.S.I., C-I.E. Competition for the medal is open to the 
world and it will be awarded tricnnially for the best work on Deccan arclueology 
or history. 

The Society is continuing its vigorous life under the new President, Sir 
Stuart Fraser, K.C.S.I., C.I.E. 

9. Expenditure.— 1 The expenditure on conservation during the year was O S. 
Rs. 33,38* (B.G. Rs. 28,612). The full grant of O.S. Rs. 45.°°° <*> uM l,ot hc 
utilized, as repairs to many buildings were not taken in hand until some time 
after the estimates had been sanctioned. The grants arc allotted annually to t»c 
spent on conservation and all efforts should be made to avoid lapses. Conserva- 
tion work was carried on at KUora, Bidar, Ittagi, Hyderabad, Usmnnabad, 
Aurangabad, Karimnagar, Nanded, Gulbarga and Warangal 

The maintenance of the Department cost O.S. Rs. 17,181 (B.G. Rs. 14,726) 

10. Photographs and Drawings. -The Report has been illustrated by scvcrul 
of the photographs which were taken (72 in all) during the course of the year. 
Mr. Yazdani has selected, as type specimens, the following Toll Mas j id to 
represent the Qujb Sliahi style ; the Dichpalli and Naginatha temples to illus- 
trate the Mediaeval Deccan temple style ; Shah I.utfullah’s tomb at Timurni for 
the Pathan style ; and the BOoti Masjid (late Mughal ]>cri<xl) as a mixture of 
Hindu, Mughal and Qujb S^ahi styles of architecture. 

Several Large drawings and some maps and sketches were also prepared. 

11. Publications. — Tlie text and translation of the Daulatabad plates of 
Jagadekamalla were published as Xo. 2 of the Hyderabad A nhcrotogicai Series. 
The Superintendent edited the 1913 M volume of the Epigraphia Indo-Moslemica 
and Fuse. Ill of the Shah Jahan Namah ( Bibliotheca Indica), and contributed a 
paper on the Palampet temples to the Annual Report of the Director General of 
Arclueology in India, an essay on Megalithic remains in the l>eccan to the 
Journal of the Hyderabad Archwological Society, aud four papers on Islamic 
inscriptions to the Epigraphia Indo-Moslemica lot 1915-16. 

12. Conclusion. — Mr. Yazdani is to be congratulated on a successful year’s 
work and on the production of a lucid and interesting report. He has kept in 
view the primary necessity of all arclueological work, namely, conservation ; and 




X 



after giving this a fair share of attention has tamed to the other aspect, explo- 
ration. On these two rests all true archsological progress. 

His Exalted Highness’ Government desire to express their appreciation of 
Mr. Yazdani’s services. 

(By order) 

A. Hvdari, 



Secretary to Government, Judicial, Police 
and General Departments. 



Copy forwarded to : — 

1. The Assistant Minister Peshi to His Exalted Highness the Nizam. 

2 . The Assistant Minister, Political Dcjiartment. 

3. The Secretary to Government, Financial Department. 

Tlie Secretary to Government, Revenue Department. 

5. The Secretary to Government, Public Works Department. 

6. The Superintendent of Archeology. 

7. The Superintendent, Government Press, for publication in the Jarida. 





No. 6o. 



From 

G. Yazdami, Esq., M.A., 

Superintendent of Archerologv, 

His Exalted Highness the Nizam’s Dominions, 



To 



Tim Secretary to Government, 

Judicial, Police and General Departments. 



Dated Hyderabad ( Dn .), the zoth March, IQ 18. 



Sir, 

I hove the honour to submit herewith two copies of the Report on 
the working of the Archeological Department for the year i jz6 Fasli (1916-17 
A.n). 

A set of the photographs taken during the year under report has already 
been submitted to Government. 

I luve the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your most ol>edient servant, 

G. Yazoani, 

Superintendent. 




Annual Report of the Archaeological Department, 

Hyderabad State 

(or 

1916-17 A.D. (1326 F). 



On the *7lh UrdlbihisJjt (31st March. 19x7) the tenn of the Superintendent's PwmmI. 
services expired, but H. IC. IT s. Government were pleased to ask the Government 
of India for the loan of his services for a further period of three years (i.e. up to 
31st March, 1920), to which proposal the Utter Government agreed. Following 
the extension of the Superintendent’s services II K H’s. Government also made 
the Department, which hud hitherto been in an experimental stage, permanent 
(vide Furman dated 18th RaraajAu, 1335 A H ). 

The Superintendent was on privilege leave from the xst Ttr to the 15th 
Sbahriwur (6th May to 2ist July), but during this period work of an urgent 
nature was sent to him for disposal and there was no change in the personnel of 
the Department, 

Owing to the prevalence of plague in the Dominions, it was not found 10. r» 
practicable to carry out fully the programme published in last year’s Report 
However, the Superintendent was able to devote more time to the monuments in 
the Warangal district, which was more or less free from the epidemic, and also to 
pay short visits to several places in the Karlmnagar and Aurangabad districts The 
details of his tour are given in the diary published lierewith ( vide Appendix A). 

The temples at I’alampet, which represent, perliaps, the brightest stars in CMMrvatiom. 
the galaxy of medieval Deccan temples, were carefully examined. This group 
has remained in obscurity owing to its unfavourable situation, being at some 
distance from the beaten track. On a platform (6' 4' high) of a cruciform plan 
stands the great temple. The plinth instead of being plain has been divided 
into foliating surfaces, which give a very pleasing effect to the general plan of 
the monument, and a space 10 ft. wide all around the temple once formed a 
sort of promenade for devout pilgrims to view the long panels of impassioned 
figurine which adorn the exterior of the building. These carvings are of a most 
heterogeneous character, consisting of gods, goddesses, warriors, acrobats, musi- 
cians, dancing girls — in different and often obscene attitudes. A peculiarity of 
this building is the figure brackets which spring from the shoulder of the outer 
pillars and nominally support the ponderous ckkau'a beams. They are mere 
ornaments having no architectural purpose, and represent the intermediate stage 
between their earlier analogues at Sanclii and the later examples at Vijayanagar 




2 



Annual Report, 19x4-15, PI- V). Twelve of them consist of female figures which, 
though executed with great precision and accuracy, in general effect are not very 
pleasing to the eye. The fingers with long nails are exceptionally good, the 
poses of the body arc also in some cases graceful, but the contour and the expres- 
sion of the face are less successful and represent very poor art. The floral designs 
and figures of animals, on the other hand, arc exceedingly fine, and one is tempted 
to think that the artists would not have failed so miserably in their delineation of 
the human form if their work had not been dominated by religious convention- 
alities. 

The architecture of the building is lofty and grand and there is a decided 
sense of proportion and symmetry. The temple represents the full development 
of the mediaeval Deccan style, which Fergusson has termed ‘Chalukyan.’ Mr. 
Ha veil, in his enthusiastic analysis of symbolism in Indian architecture, speaks of 
this designation as ‘delusive,’ but the reasons which led Fergusson to adopt the 
term were, that the style developed its distinctive features during the reign 
of the Chalukya dynasty, and that it flourished in the country which was 
under their sway. Recently some scholars, dissatisfied with the terminology 
of Fergussou, have adopted equally indefinite terms, to wit. the temples of this 
type in the Mysore State liave been called ‘ Huysala/ which term, if applied to 
their analogues in Wnruugal, the scat of Kakatya kings, bcomics equally perplex- 
ing.' If the influence of the Chalukya dynasty is not considered to l>c the main 
factor in the evolution of the style, the term * Chalukyan ’ might be changed for 
' DekhanI which can be the only other appropriate name for the style. 

The temple has several inscriptions which, as stated in the last year’s Report, 
arc being edited by Dr. I.. D. Barnett. Officer in charge Oriental MSS , British 
Museum, for the Hyderabad Arcfueolofiial Senes, and w ill lie published shortly. 

The other temples at Palampet although of smaller dimensions arc built more 
or less in tlie same style, and in some cases arc adorned with sculptures of 
surpassing beauty. For instance, the scene represented on a door panel of the 
temple at the western end of the Ramappa Uke Band, in which a sylvan deity 
standing in front is shown removing a thorn from her foot, is full of life and 
exhibits wonderful conception on the part of tire artist [Annual Report, 19x5-16, 
Pi. IX b). 

These monuments though structurally in a fair state of preservation were em- 
bosomed in a thick growth of rank vegetation, and the interiors were extremely 
filthy. The Superintendent immediately after his inspection of the temples 
had them thoroughly cleared of grass and plants, and their plinths fully exi>osed 
and courtyards levelled and cleaned. These simple measures have not only saved 
the buildings from falling into rapid ruin, but have also considerably improved 
their general appearance 

In the Karimnagar District the Sivitc temple at Uparpalli. a photograph of 
which was published in the last year's Report (PI. VIII a), was carefully examined. 

I The tempi* at Aoodah (Parbbaai) bear* a *?•»! ramUax* to the tamon* tempi* at Halebid. and it would 
be entirely bewd e Urn pdat to nan* the architect:**! rtyk of the toraet ■ HoyaUa • tor it -a. built by the 
Yadara kin*, ol Deosui (Pfe. V-VTI). 




3 

The temple consists of a square hall 2 f each way, with shrines and ante- 
chambers at the northern, western and southern ends (see plan, PI. Ill 6). The 
architecture of the temple is rather plain and the carvings also are simple. On 
the frieze of the northern shrine GaneSa is represented dancing, apparently exult- 
ant at his victory over an evil spirit who is shown prostrated at GaneSa's feet. 
Adjoining the temple in the southern direction there is an open pillared-hall with 
a shrine at its western end The hall seems to have been built at a comparatively 
later period and the walls of the shrine are incomplete. 

The roof of the temple needs attention and the pillars require resetting as 
they are not in plumb. Neat supports should be provided for the broken 
lintels: the courtyard should be levelled and cleaned, and grass and other 
vegetation thoroughly removed from the roof and walls of the building. A note 
embodying these measures will be submitted to Government shortly. 

In the old city of Hyderabad, along the road which runs from the PurAna 
Pul to Golconda, some of the most beautiful monuments of the Qutb .Shah! period 
may be seen. They comprise shrines, mosques, baths, facades of old slrops and 
dwelling houses, and as a large number of them have inscriptions they possess 
nn additional interest for the antiquary Mr A. Hvdari. whose knowledge of and 
interest in the monuments of tbe Dominions are always of great assistance to the 
Department, drew the attention of the Superintendent to a mosque of this group 
called the Toll Musjid The building is very typical of the general character of 
the Qutb SbAlti style and will be described here in some detail It was built by 
Musa Khan, 1 a dignitary of the court of ‘Abdullah Qutb $b&h. who held the office 
of Mahalldar (Lord Chamberlain), but in time of war he played also the ride of a 
general. An inscription carved in the prayer-niche gives 1082 A. II. (1671 A.D.) 
ns the date of the erection of the building * 

• For Mom Mu me H *U. V* 1 ». f. III. «ad tm+» fafca W . 101314. PI ?«•». 

* The tnwnpttoo tew*. thwa — 

Aft .11 ft-*— * .>*•— c* ** */-»- 

a f L-ft, > jj—t I— - si s—J. w 

i-ftf 

Fv wfcx* it Ikt ' F— GW. IW Om*. IS, 

Mu. a Kjun built tbi. neeque. 

Which »a* completed in the i*i<D 0 / AW-nih 

A* a chronogram tot the moeqoe this wa* amounted (by 'be larl^bW Speaker I : 

•• Built tbe awpie m tbe name o I God." icdl A H.mltyl A.D. 

Id the courtyard of the mo- I wo laitiari daba of b lack baaah (>»' a i|*> at* placed on a gtava. The 
inaenpeion record, tbe ereetioa of a mewqa* la KHJ A H daiV| tbe reign of ‘Abdullah Qnlb &ab Tbe Biuujuc 
rvletred to in tbe Iwe rt p U lB i a appwrenU* <1 Seftat fiom the Tob Maijid beeaaar tbe latlet wa. elected In 
ic«j A.H. 

The teat of tbe Uuenpttou U ft. follow. _ 

'Ah y*- > wf (V* ** W ^ ** >» 

U. & al* ft- »U fti ^ J*) u»T r-^ 4 - 



■ * ftUi wiai ftfii 



(Comltsmsi). 



4 



The mosque is situated within an extensive enclosure which originally had 
a large garden, but no vestige of it remains now. Flights of steps on three sides 
— east, north and south-lead the visitor to an elevated terrace (6 ft. high) 
forming the courtyard of the mosque. The prayer-hall is four feet higher and 
consists of a double hall, the outer apartment having five arched openings and 
the inner only three, the place of the extreme openings towards north and south 
being occupied by two niches built in the pillar and lintel style. In the inner 
hall at the western end there is a prayer-niche in the form of a semi-decagon. 
Two lofty minarets (6oft high, approximately) flank the building at each side 
(north and south), and a number of small cupolas adorn the roof. The lower 
part of the mosque up to the roof is built of ashlar masonry, while the upper part 
is constructed of brick and lime, probably to carry cut-plaster decorations. 

Tile chief feature of the building is its decorations, which have a strong 
Hindu influence in motif as well as in sentiment. To wit. the circular earthen 
pot which is so common a theme in Hindu architectural ornamentation is largely 
adopted here— (I) the shafts of the minarets rise from pot-shaped haws, ( 2 ) the 
facade is adorned with rows of black basalt pots cut in relief Again, elephant- 
tusk brackets, which are absolutely Hindu in origin the figure of an animal 
being repugnant to orthodox Muslim taste -have »>cm used profusely in the 
mosque. Further, there are niches in the pillar and lintel style identical in form 
with niches in temples for the accommodation of images. Another Hindu feature, 
which may escai>c the notice of a casual visitor, is that just as the Hindu adorns 
the exterior surface of the temple with miniature sikharas and other architectural 
detail, in the mosque also the tops of niche* are adorned with miniature mosques 
and minarets. 

In Hindu temples the decorations arc often carried to excess and conven- 
tionality predominates over artistic sen*- These peculiarities arc superabundant 
in this mosque ns also in other yu*h Shfthi monuments. The cut-plaster decora- 
tions are always excessive, and the number of small turrets and cupolas is unneces- 
sarily large. In this mosque an extraordinary illustration of conventionality 
ruling artistic taste may be seeu in the facade of the inner apartment of the 
hall, which is adorned with a ckkajjm supported on elephant-tusk brackets and is 
extremely incongruous there. Another instance of blind conventionality is the 
use of the trellis-work screens which probably originated from the Zenana palaces 
where they were quite appropriate. In this mosque tire space between tire 
minarets on the roof is filled with a trellis screen of exquisite workmanship. 
The jati designs arc extremely fine and artistic ; but the screen has no archi- 



In th. r.ign ol Ibc weU-wutoag king. of tea real r own, 

Thla building «*. completed th-ough the -Sot.. <4 the bbaitt. «be leude. 
When t .iked the Invinble lnipir« lot ■ chronogram lor the brnMiag. 

- Thu iBoeqae -u built bj tbe order of the bug 'Abdallah ” 

Written br LulfuDah ilHuigi at-Tibreri. ro*j A.H <i6jj Al> I 

In calculating tbe numerical rhlue of tbe letter* the Um of 'Abdn 
twice. 



be mid. 




fi 

tectural purpose there and shows bad taste. The impression made by such 
buildings overloaded with decoration is, if one may say so, like the impression 
left by the ostentatious and lavish display of personal adornment generally 
favoured by lowly persons suddenly become rich. 

The Toll Masjid is in need of slight repairs, and the Superintendent intends 
to have the following measures executed in consultation with the Ecclesiastical 
Department : — (i) laying out a muram path (4 ft. broad) from the Golconda road 
to the flight of steps towards the north ; (2) thorough repair of steps on all the 
three sides; (3) cleaning and repair of the terraced courtyard of the mosque, 
which will include the restoration and resetting of missing and loose marginal 
stones of the courtyard and the cistern for ablutions ; (4) thorough repair to the 
curtain-wall behind the mosque (towards west) ; (5) the removal of small plants 
growing on the building ; and (6) exposing the plinth of the building and laying 
out a muram path (4 ft. wide) all round, with a sharp slope outside so that the 
rain water may not sink into the foundation of the mosque. 

In the Aurangabad district the campaign of conservation started two years 
ago has been carried on vigorously, and the repairs to the Buddhist caves at 
Aurangabad and to the Sivitc temple at Anwft have nearly reached completion. 
In the matter of the preservation of the Ajanfa paintings Sir John Marshall was 
kind enough to consult the three most notable experts of ** restauri" in Italy— 
M. I.uigi Cavenaghi, to whom is due the restoration of the "Cenacolo" of Leo- 
nardo de Vinci ; (2) Prof. Tito Vcnturini, who restored the frescoes of the dome 
of Piuma ; and (3) Prof, fabmio I.ucsrini, who was entrusted with the restora- 
tion of the paintings of some ancient tombs in Egypt. The process of preserva- 
tion suggested by the specialists requires much expert knowledge and technical 
skill, so His Exalted Highness* Government have desired the Director General of 
Arclucology kindly to engage the services of one of thev artists and to bring him 
out for a winter to India. 

In Adbur (November) the Superintendent visited the Madras Museum where, 
not contrary to his expectations, he found a large quantity of marked pottery 
which he carefully studied, and a note on which has since been published in the 
Journal of the Hyderabad Archaeological Society, No. 3, 1917. The most notable 
feature about the marks is that 75 per cent of them are identical with the 
alphabetic signs given by Evans in his comparative table showing the relation in 
Cretan and Aegean, Egypto-I.ibyan and Libyan writings. An identity to such 
an extent cannot be accidental, and one is led to believe that the cairn-builder of 
Southern India had a distinct connection, either of stock or culture, with the 
Mediterranean race whom Sergi calls Eur-African. This view gains further 



I In lb. paper published in the <Ko. J. p. 6l> tbe Superintendent pointed oat tbe similarity ol 

several ol tlnw mark* to Brahmi letters. The siaulantv ™*T Kind lor u much to significance Ike resemblance 
»' <>>e Phmnidan character* to the alpha betiform u?u o 4 Bar ftu dolacai aboil which Sap [UriUtrtMntan 
Hit. p joi) observes: “The characters called Pboaiaaa are oaly a Solved lorn ol the alphabetiform signs 
that appeared during prehistoric times in Alrica, in tbe UoUle.rars.aa. and to Weater* Europe The Phcmicians. 
if indeed it was the Plvroiciaas who di-rised the alphabet . only systematised sagos that .sere already known and 
already indicated phonetic characters” Developing tbe orgsaent. n is dm unlikely that in India Brahmi 
may alto be connected with the prehistoric marks current m the Deccan. 



Eacavatlon. 





« 




uatflauudimutiuatjaayH 
uMEiaapiaaQaaya^K^BB 
passri^EJBBaatf.EJ'^rjfiiia 
BfaKiaElStri^nBMBBBBBBB 

muH tiiiur ii juhuui ihbbbb 

UUUUfcaMaaUriMHHHMUHB 
BEcejaHHtirraHMMiHi 
t'JttHUSMHHUUU 



fi\ net 



M..h.“ found oo poUr-T dug <~ fro- calm. U Ih. Dmcm *»d So-«h... MU 



ft > 



f It 9 om 9 +T I fl> 

Um«t » ruing >I|M oo clay rumh (D. ™ <"«»«>> 

*W. Wn/4.rtoo — ff«r. Fig »'■ 



(l) Archaic Pbcrnlciao ch.t.clm: (») 

Cj) nc—d »«od.i (4) lb«-fc«l iotcHoUon: (S> '-*« 
thaginUa coin: (6> Archaic Hebrew. (UaorBanl). 



Sagi.Va 



» R*,. Fig- IS. 













! #/\KcAs*-^ 



7 




»» 5 - 




Cc*»p.r.K* cl •Iph.b.nlo— **C n * <Kv*d«>. 




mvv.. Lv.r:. 
/■X-HTXt 

h ty 




i:p.„r.phy. 



8 

support from the uniformin’ in the shape and ornamentation of pottery, in the 
working of the stone, and in the ritual of the dead as well as in the curious mode 
of burial — in an extended position, in a doubled up and crouching position, and 
the burial of several bodies together as in family vaults. The “ Dravidian prob- 
lem ” which has hitherto been a tangled knot is being studied in this light by 
some scholars, and Mr. F. J. Richards, I C S., has collected some valuable infor- 
mation on this subject from an ethnographic point of view. 

During the year under review Dr. E. H. Hunt opened altogether forty cairns 
at Maula ‘AH, Bowcnpalli (near Secunderabad) and Raiglr. The most important 
finds among copper articles consist of a bell, a semi-circular trinket, probably an 
amulet, and a few ornamental head bands for the bull Among iron relics lie 
found at Bowcnpalli a trident to which the effigy of a buffalo skeleton is attached. 
The find is interesting and indicates that the caim wherein it was found is of a 
comparatively late date — of a period when the caim-builder had imbibed some 
of the religious beliefs of the conquering Aryan stock The trident with the 
buffalo skeleton apparently represent the victory of Siva over the demon MaliiSa 
which is so favourite a theme in Hindu sculpture. It was evidently put into the 
cairn to avert the influence of evil spirits. 

Dr. K. H. Hunt has kindly promised to contribute a paper on his recent 
excavations to the Journal of the Hyderabad Archa-ological Society. 

No Hindu inscription of importance was discovered during the year although 
several minor Telugu epigraphs were copied at Medak and Bhainaa. 

Dr I,. I>. Barnett, to whom the editing of the Paklial, Ramappa and I'par- 
palll inscriptions was entrusted (see last year’s Report, p. io), 1ms, in spite of the 
many other calls on his leisure, kindly completed his readings and translations 
of the last two inscripti.wis, and his scholarly monograph on them is now ready 
for publication (No. j, Hydtrab.nl Anhaologital Scrits). Dr. I.. D. Barnett 
proposes to edit «eparatclv the inscription of Pftkhal on account of its great 
length. 

In Muslim epigraphy the outstanding feature of the year's work is the 
acquirement of a complete set of rubbings of the inscriptions in the Golconda 
tombs and their publication with critical notes in the Eptgraplna Indo-Moslemica, 
1915-16. Several of these inscriptions are of unique value for the chronology of 
the Qujb Shah I j>eriod, because contemporary history in some cases offers very 
scanty information and scholars arc likely to go astray. It was evidently due 
to these difficulties that Professor Jadu Nath Sarkar, whose reputation as an 
enthusiastic and careful student of Indian history is well established, was led by 
contemporary writings to fix 1086 A H. as the date of ‘Abdullah Qutb Shah’s 

• (a Southern India the mode of banal— ia a doeibUd op pootioo or Id an rjtroded poaitloai— varies to a large 
• neat according to the avoibMity oi ttoor. Ia the districts •hoc floor ii plentiful the dead have been 
boned in atone cuts in an extended pcatioa. Oa the other hand la place, where -loo. u rote banal in a crouched 
position In dish duped cloy cofittw. or big earthen urns has bee* noticed. In cases the burial of bone i* 

bone lias been noticed . which perhaps tint bodies were Srrt boned at a dfflerent place and Uter on shifted 
to a better resting place- s foody mil, a fawsbtad oe -He’s tomb, or a spiritual Under, grotto In >ome 
hare been found m a cabined form, wtuch usdsente that " eremstioa ”, the practice prevalent among 
stock, had occapied the place <4 ” inbumalxo.” Such burials are apparently of a lata 



un>s i 
th* n 
dut. 



Aryan 




» 



death, although the inscription on his tomb clearly shows that he died in 
1083 A.H.' 

Besides the careful study of the epitaphs in the Golconda tombs the Super- 
intendent has taken rubbings of several interesting Bahuiau! and Qut.b Sfcahl 
inscriptions in the Medak Fort and the Biloll mosque. Another inscription was 
copied at Nandpur— 32 miles north of Hyderabad, in the Paigfth ‘Ilaqa of the 
late Nawab Khurshld Jah, which shows that KhafI Khan, the great historian, 
on jierceiving the scarcity of water in the town, built a large well of sweet 
water in 1140 A.H (1727 A.D.). 

During the year three hundred and ninety-seven coins were acquired as Numiimaiio. 
treasure-trove finds. Below is a list showing the districts and localities from 
which they were received : 

Class Distrut Locality 

16 gold coins of the Vijayanagar dynasty Karfmnagar . . Sirser. 

188 silver coins of the Mughal emperors .. Mahbubnagar .. Yalkacbarln. 

187 „ „ „ „ „ Do. .. Pargl. 

1 silver Mughal coin . . . . Aurangabad , . Anbar. 

4 silver coins of the A*af Jah! dynasty . . Nanded . . Hadgaon. 

1 copper dub of Humayan Bohmnnl , . Do. . . Do. 

Of the coins received from the MahbQbnagar district many are valuable as 
belonging to mints not represented in the cabinets of either the Indian Museum 
or the I.ahorc Museum (Plate XIII). A classified catalogue of these coins is 
published as Appendix G of the Report The last Column gives the price of the 
coins which are for sale or can be offered gratis to those institutions or Govern- 
ments with whom- H. E. H's. Government is on terras of exchange. The last 
date to apply for these coins is March 31st, 1919, when they will be distributed 
with due regard to the claims of each applicant 

In last year s Report it was noted that Government had sought the advice n.win). 
of several experts in the matter of selecting a suitable candidate for the post 
of Curator of the Hyderabad Museum. During the year several names were 
recommended by specialists, and the case is now before Government for final 
decision.* The new appointment of the Director of Industries, recently created 
by H. F.. H's. Government, it is hoped, will facilitate the initial equipment and 
subsequent development of the economic side of the Museum 

The most notable feature of the year’s work is the institution of a medal iu Hyderabad 
memory of the late Sir Alexander Piuhey, K.C.S.I., C.I.E., the founder and first caVs'u'i,!' 
President of the Society. The competition for the medal is open to scholars in 
any part of the world, and it will be awarded triennially for the best work on 
Deccan archaeology or history. 

During the year several interesting papers were read under the auspices 
of the Society, and a volume of the Journal (No. 3) comprising the Society’s 

I ThU <|nestion has been (ally dUcoated la (be Jmrmal at (he Hedetabad Archzotegical Sooely. No. 3, 1917, 

pp. 8o-*i. 

» Since -.King (h. Rcport T . Slreenaiaa. Bat-at-La.. hot been ^ppottwd Cnr.loe 




10 



Publication*. 



library. 



PHol i»*r*pl<* 



Drawings. 

liapvnJitnra 
on Conserve- 
lion. 



transactions was published. The number of ordinary members increased from 
fifty-five to eighty. 

The publications issued by the Archaeological Department during the year 
are noted below : — 

(1) Annual Report, 1915-16 A.D. (1325 F.).' 

(2) The Daulatahid Plates of Jagadekamal/a, Hyderabad Archaeological 
Series, No. 2. 

In addition, the Superintendent edited the Journal (No. 3) of the Hyderabad 
Archaeological Society, the Epigraphia I ndo-M oslemica , 1913-14, and the $hak 
Jahan Namah (Fasc. III). The last work is l»eing published under the auspices 
of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, and the Superintendent has been engaged for 
a considerable time in editing it, doing the work in pieces as opportunity 
offered. 

The Superintendent, as usual, also contributed a detailed article this year 
on the temples of Palampet, to the Annual Report of the Director General of 
Archaeology, Part II; one essay on the ” Megalith ic Remains of the Deccan” 
to the Journal of the Hyderabad Archeaological Society, 19x7; and four essays 
on Islamic inscriptions to the Epigraphia J ndo-M oslemica, 1915-16. 

Fifty-six new books were added to the library of the Department, of which 
twenty-eight were purchased and the rest were received as presents. Among the 
purchased volumes there is a manuscript statistical account of the Deccan com- 
piled in the reign of Muhammad §|ifth It is written somewhat in the style of 
the modern gazetteers, and, besides giving a short history of important places, 
contains full statistical tables of the assessment ol all the various districts and 
villages. The book seems to be identical to MS. No. 470 of the India Office 
Library (C/. Catalogue of Persian MSS by £the). 

Seventy-two photographs were taken during the year. A complete set of 
them has been submitted to (Wwernment. Several of the photographs have been 
reproduced in this Report to illustrate the main architectural features of the 
monuments of the Deccan. Students of Indian art and architecture have often 
complained against the scarcity of illustrative material,' and this Department 
since its institution has endeavoured to lessen the scarcity by publishing every 
year a certain number of plates illustrative of choice specimens of Deccan art, 
A complete list of the negatives is given in Appendix E. 

During the year seven large drawings and several maps and sketches were 
prepared. The titles, scales, etc., of the large drawings arc given in Appendix F. 

The expenditure on the conservation of monuments in the Dominions 
amounted to O.S. Rs. 33.381-7-8 (B.G. Rs. 28,612-11-2). The total amount of 
the Government grant could not be spent fully, as repairs to many buildings were 
not taken in hand owing to the estimates not being sanctioned. Conservation 
work is now in progress at Ajanta. Bidar, Ittag! (Raichur) and several other places, 

• It la ODloftnBat* that the Urdu 
Vnta could not b« «o*d ic lime. 

• See JHA.S.. No. 1916. p. ijj. 
vot. ir. p. iso 



ol tbe Report 



to tbe grc*t deUy mmde by tbe Government 
EajJr** ArcKiSeJurt by Pcjgassan and Burgess. 




II 



and it is hoped that the liberal grant of Government will be fully utilized in 
coming years. A detailed statement of the expenditure is given in Appendix C. 

During the period under report a sum of O.S. Rs. 17,181-1-4 (B.G. 

Rs. 14,726-10-8) was spent on the maintenance of the Department. A detailed tcnance of the 
statement of the expenditure is given in Appendix B. 

In Dai and Bailitnan (November and December) it is intended to Visit those roor Pro- 
monuments in the Medals, Nizamabad, Nanded and ParbhanI districts which have KrT^-iS 
not been examined yet owing to their distance from the railway line. Isfand&r ( ' 3 * 7 
and Farwardln (January and February) will be devoted to the exploration of the 
Asifabad {‘Adilabad) district which has hitherto remained terra incognita to 
archaeologists, due to the difficulty of communication and density of jungle. 

Besides this, short visits according to emergency will be paid to places where 
conservation work is in progress 

G. Yazdaki, 

Hydkkabap, Dkccan : ) Superintendent 0/ Archaeology, 

f H. E. H. the S' 1 cam's Dominions, 

20th March, 1918. 1 




APPENDICES 




Appendix A. 

SCPKBINntMDKNT’S DlARY. 



(7 « tktcbor, 1916. to bik OUoUr. 19x7—11! AH,u, to zgth Abim, U* Fasti) 






16 



Appexdix A — concld 



Mod lb 


D*u 


PUc« 


December 


20 th- 24 th .. 1 


Duty at headquarters 


{Baikman) 


(I7A-2ISO 




M 


25th 


Hyderabad to Oaxipet- 


M 


26U. 

(*W> 


yaxipet to Uparpallt. 


.. •• 1 


27th .. I 

( 3 <A) 


Uparpalhtoyaxipet- 


ft • • 


28th 

(i 3 ^» 


Qazipet to Hyderabad. 


.. 


2 Q»ll-JI«t 

(J6A-38A) 


Duty at headquarter*. 


January 


r*t-(i*t 


Do. 


{BMmiH & ht*nd») 


(aqA-aqA) 




February 

(/j/iin Jit & FarvJrilm) 


i*t -aoth 
(joA-rqA) 


Do 

1 »- / *• « 




IlktrlaeaUil |a r^vWwtrla anil Kirk 




(*oA> 


H>Ocf joau to ootcona* inn cmck. 


•• 


22nd-aSth .. j 

(2fM-2 7 »*) 


Duty at headquarter*. 


March . . 1 




Do. 


(F-ne-rrfl- & Vri Ibi- 


(a** > 8 / 4 ) 




*IP) 

M • • 


ajrd 

(toA) 


Hyderabad to (iolconda and back. 


H • • 


24 th- l!*t 
( 20 A- 27 A) 


Duty at headquarlet*. 


April 

((/nAMIriAf « HA»r<UJ) 


m-<»th 

(a 8 A- 5 A) 


Do. 


" 


10th 

(6A) 


Hyderabad to Bowen pal li and back. 


If * * 


1 ntb-totb 
(7A-26AI 


Doty at headquarters. 


May to July 


I*t-2nd 


Hyderabad to Aurangabad. 


(hiurdat to S/iakr,t*ir) 


( 27 A- 28 A) 




» 


3 rd- 5 th 

(agA- 3»4 


Halt at Aurangabad. 


#1 * * 


6th May to 2t« July . . 
(Irf TXr to 15 A S^Ari- 

22 ud~ 3 rst 


On leave. 




Duty at headquarter*. 


(16A-25A) 


August to October 


1st August to 5 th Oct. 


Do. 


(St*kriw*r to Aten) 


1 (26A SkiMritr-ir to JO A 






17 



Appendix B. 



Expenditure on the Arckmctogieed Department. Hyierebid. during Ike /ear. 7 tk October. 1916. to 6 A 

October. 1917 (1326 Ml). 

Salaries — R* As. P. Rs. As. P. 



Salaries : — 

Superintendent (B.G. Rs. 300-50—600) 
Contribulion (B.G. Rs. 62—6—0) 
House-rent (Rs. 75) 

Establishment . . 

Grain Compensation 



Travelling allowances — 
Superintendent 
Establish meut 

Contingencies 

Fixed Contingencies 



Livery (or peons 



6.719 to o 
*75 o o 
000 o o 
2&7 6 8 

17? It 9 

36 0 o 
46 I 10 

784 10 o 
5 

boo o o 
43 o o 
584 o o 
1.350 o o 
100 o 0 
4*3 ° •> 



“■433 «5 3 



1.333 & 3 



Supply and Services 

Purchase o( Drawing, Survey and Photo article* 



% 



II 8 



4.102 o o 



J9« “ 8 



G»AKD ToTAl 



X7.X8I I 4 
(B.G. 14.7*6 10 3) 



Statement of expenditure on the C 

the veer. 7 tk * 



.turn •/ Ancient Monmmenli in Ike Hyderabad Stale, during 
. 1916. to 6 rt October. 1917 («3*6 Feilit. 



OMtiirt. 



UxnOtj 



Hnmeo t 



■pesl duiiac 
• year 



Rs. As. P 

Hyderabad Hyderabad Repairs to the Btd- 0.310 o o, 
City. sbahrAshurKfrini 



Rs. As. P. 

1,042 14 “ Work was com- 



to the Mas- 4.734 14 



• - Hyderabad Repairs to the Jof- 1.537 o 
City. wan Han*. 

. • Bidar . . Repairs to the tomb 466 o 



. . ( Repairs to the tomb 466 o O 

1 

. . | Repairs to the tomb 972 o o 
of Amir BarJd. 



375 9 4 



1.347 6 7 Completed. 



465 3 * 



774 8 8 



4.905 10 8 



Appendix C —<oncld. 



Dutr.ct 




Brought forward . . 



Madrasahof Salary of 
i Mahmud 
Gawan. 

Tomba of Safari** o 
Bahmam 
and Barid 
Shi hi 



R*. A*. P.I 

.... 

16800 
168 o o 



Bidar Mo 
DMDtS. 



Draftsman. 



Kllora . . Special repairs to the , 33 fill 0 
I caves. 

Anwi . . | Repairs to tbetcraplc. 2.963 0 
Aurangabad Repairs to the carca. 3,961 o 
DauIaUbod Repairs to the Port. 2.900 0 



sioo of re- 
to the At- 



.. Maintenance of Blbv r.000 o 
ka-Maqbarfia. 

Kllora .. Maintenance of the 400 o 
caves.' 

DaulatiMd Maintenance of the 2.300 o 



Ajatyt* .. Salaries of watchmen. 300 

I Kauci . . Watering the trees in 
the kuuta Bungalow 



Sanded . . 


Qandhir . . 


Repairs to the Fort. 1.500 0 


Gulbarga . . 


Gulbarga. . 


Maintenance of Ar- 4*8 0 






c Ideological build 


Warangal 


Palampet 


Salary of the watch- 96 0 



■I «p«>t Uunnf 

lb. y-r. 



Rs. As P. 

9.905 «o 8 

165 o o 
t68 o o 



675 


0 


675 0 


O 


*3* 


8 11 


231 8 


11 


500 


0 0. 


499 0 


0 


33.0*9 


0 0 


*.357 8 


2 


*.963 


0 0 


1.464 *5 


6 


3.461 


0 0 


4.41* 0 


0 


2.400 


0 0 


2.176 2 


0 


6.180 


0 0 


7.743 3 


5 



1,006 11 1 

361 15 3 

2.304 12 9 

3J4 3 *« 
179 12 10 

M99 » o 
414 6 8 

96 o o 



Deduct amount over 
charged. 

Total Expenditure 
1916-17 (1326 F.) 



37.J/5 «J 4 
3.794 * « 



33 38* 9 8' 
(B.G. 28.612 12 io> 




19 



Appendix D. 



List of books in Ike Library of Ike Superintendent of Archeology, Hyderabad, acquired during Ike year. 

ytk October, 19x6. to 6 Ik October. 1917 (1326 F.) 



S«UU No. 


Titk. 


RtlUUI 




JOt’BNAIJ AMD PKUODICAL Pl'BUCATlOM*. 




449 


The Journal oi the Rot*! Asiatic Society of Great BHuin and 
Ireland 19x7. ParU MV. 


Purchased. 


450-5 « 


The Journal of the Panjab Historical Society. Vols. V-VI . . 


Presented by the Pub- 
lisher*. 


452 


The Journal of the U.P. Historical Society, So. 1. 19x7 


Do. 


453 


The Journal of the Bihar and Onus Research Society. Vol. Ill, 
Parts x-4, 1917. 


Do. 


454 


The Journal of the Hyderabad Archeological Society. Vol. II. 

1917- 


Do. 


455 - 3 & 


The Journal of the Mythic Society. Vol. MI (Part. 1-4), 
Vol. VIII (Part. x-i). 


Do. 


457 


The Journal of the Rangya Sahitya. Calcutta. 1917. a parts .. 


Do. 


45 ® 


The Ceylon Antiquary, Vol. II. Part 4. and Vol. III. Part* 1-3 


Do 


459*60 


Bulletin de V Ernie Pranome d'BatrAme-Orieut Tom* XVI. 
No. 3. «nd Tome XVII. No. 1 and 3 


Do. 


46« 


Litta de* Publication* et Tabic* do Bulletin (1901-1015). 1917; 


Do. 


462 


Indian Architecture, Part* x-6 


Purchased. 


463 


Ruroan — 

A nnu tl Report of the Archeological Survey of India. Part I. 
1915-16. 


Presented by Govern- 
ment of India. 


464 


Do. do. Part II. IQI3-14 


Do 


465 


,1 mw 14.1/ Progress Retort of the Sunerintendent. Hindu and 
Roddhist Monuments. Northern Grde. 1916. 


,to 


466 


Report of the Superintendent of Archeology, Prontiet Grde. 
1916-17. 




467 


Annual Report of the Superintendent of Archeology, Eastern 
Grdc, 1915-16. 


Do. 


468 


Report of the Superintendent of Archeology. Rurma, 1917 . . 


Do. 


469 


Annual Report of the Archeological Superintendent. Western 
Grde. 1916. 


Do. 


470 


Report of the Archeological Superintendent. Southern Grde, 
1916-17. 


Do. 


471 


A unual Report of the Assistant Superintendent of Archeology 
for Epigraphy. Southern Grde. 1916-17. 


Do. 




20 



Appendix D — con id 


Serial No. 


TOW 


Rnutu. 




AiautoLOGiCAL SmvKY — tone Id. 




472 


Rat'd of the Archeological Department. HE.H. the Nizam'* 
Dominions. 1915-16 (1335 F.|. 


Presented by H.E.H. 

theXi/am’sGovern- 

ment. 


473 


,1 unit'll Report. Mysore .Archeological Department. 1916 


Presented by Mysore 
State. 


474 


Do. do. do. 1917 


Do. 




MONOCBAPHS— 




473 


Taw Rein Ko, Archeological Notr* 00 Pagan 


Presented by the 
Author. 


476 


Do. Archeological Notes on Mandalay .. 


Do. 


477 


Saratimkaehar. R. Knar a Temple at Soranathapur. Mysore 
Archeological Seriea, No. 1. 


Do. 


47* 

479 


Sastri. H. Krishna. Amkan P,lict of Maaki. lledcrahad Archeo- 
logical Series. No. I 

Rhandarhar. P. R . Danlatabad Plate* of lagadekatnalla 


Presented by 1I.B.H. 
the Nuam'tGo veto- 
ment 

Do. 




Rusnais (Sew Imperil Senes)— 




480 


Satin. H. Krishna. Sooth Indian Inscription*. Vol. 11 


Presented by Govern- 
ment of India. 




Arr. AacirmtCTrai. arc. 




4*1 


Coomatanaamy. A .. Boddha and the Oonpel of Buddhism . . 


Purchased. 


4*2 


Grttnwedtl. A.. Buddhist Art in India. Tr. minted by A. C. 
Giteon : revised and enlarged by J Borges* 


Do. 




HtSTOiy a an OnoosAniT. 

Mani*schipts — 

Statistical Auos.nl of the Deccan (India Office Catalogue. 
M*. No. 47«»- 


Do. 




Bibi.iothbca Indica— 




4*3 


’Abdn-l Bhfl SahhwanJ, Ma’ittpr i-Rahim! 


Do. 


484 


Muhammad Kirim, ‘Alamgfr Nima .. 


Do. 


4«5 


Muhammad Shift, Ma’ittff-i 'Alamgiri 


Do. 




PERSIAN AND AHAB!C TEXTS— 




486-87 


Ibn-ChaUikan. Wafyato-l-A'yin. Edited by F. Wnrtcnfdd. 

vob. i-n. 


Do. 


488 


A bout fed a. Geographic D*. edidH Remand 


Do. 


489 


Al.BeUisori, Futubu-l-Butdaa. Edited by M. J. De Gocge . . 


I Do. 






21 



Appendix D — ctmdd. 



Serial No. 


Title 


RlMAMKX. 




Hutoby and Gtoo%xnrr—«m<U. 




400 


StuGkuUm .4/1 izU. Maithiru-!-Kirlm. edited by Abdallah 
Khan 


Purchased. 


401 


.View Ibrahim Zuboirl, BasStiuu-s-Salsttn (History of Bijapor) 


Do. 




HtSTOtY AND GBMULAHIY OP INDIA (IN English)— 




4oa 


Al-Bfrmi, Athinil-Baqlya. Translated by C. E Sachin . . 


Do. 


403 


Do. Kitabu-l-Hind English edition by C. E Sachau 


Do. 


404 


AuringahdJ C.autUer 


Do. 


405 


Cunningham A., The Ancient Geography of India. Buddhiat 


Do. 


406-97 


Marco Pc Jo, Travel*, edited by Col. H. Yale. Vais. I-II 


Do. 


40* 


SUwaH, Major Chari,,. Texkcreh Al Valdlt of Jouher Aftabdji. 
(Oriental Tranalatioa Fundi. 


Do. 




AlCMOiOlf 




400 


Rruii FoeU. /?.. CtUloguc Ribooi k (Madras Gownraent 


Purchased. 


500 


^ Do. Catalogue of the Prehistoric Antiquities (Madras 


! Do - 


501 


Coffin Bmn. /-. Catalogue ol the Prehistoric Antiquitk* in 
the Indian Museum (Archeological Survey of India) 


Presented by Govern- 
ment of Iltdia. 


50 a 


HornrU, Jam,,. The Sacred Chank of India. Madraa Fisheries 
Bulletin No. 7 . 


Purchased. 


503 


Rm. AUuxnd/r. Catalogue of the Prehistoric Antiquities from 
Adichannalur and Pcrumboir (Madras Government Moseum) 


Do. 




MlSCKLLANKOC*. 




504 


Aiyangar. S. A'.. Tamil Studies. 


Purchased. 





22 

Appendix E. 

Hit 0/ photographic negative* prepared by the Office a/ the Superintendent of Archacdogy. Hyderabad, 

during the yen 1916-17 (1326 F.). 



S«Ml So. 


Locataty 


— 


su. 


3” 


library of Nawab 
Solar Jang, Hy- 
derabad. 


Hadiqa Hakim SanI'l. Sbkhjahan'a autograph 


H’ - 4*’ 


313 


•• 


Duplicate .. 


H 


3*3 


H 


MS written by^AH Kitib for King Abdul Ailt of 


M 


3«4 | 


99 


Matbnawi Zalill. Sfclhjahant autograph . . 


•# 


3,5 1 


Hyderabad 


Padshlhl Aihorkbana, Tde work (after repair) 




316 


Raigir (Nalgondai 


Black, polithed pot. dog <»ut from a calm 


6** M |' 


317 


M 


- , Another view 


1 • 


3«8 

319 

3*0 


•1 

Hyderabad 

Dornakal 


Red pota from a cairn 

Pota of vari««a ahapea. dug out (r.«m cairn* . . I 

Pottery from a ciat. black and red 


• • 
• • 


321 


Hyderabad 


Iron implement*, dug out from cairn* . . | 


• • 


3*2 


Ajopta (Auranga- 


Care IX. exterior . .. .. .. .. 1 


A|'.6*' 


323 


»» 


Care X. interior , , . . . . 


99 


324 


99 


Care XXVI, interior 


M 


323 


Hyderaltad 


Sculpture* in the garden of Mr. R. 1. R. Olancy’a 
bungalow. 


•• 


326 


*» 


H 99 • • * ♦ 


&i*Mr 



327 Kuppol (Kakbur! Port, Geoeral w 



32 s „ Another vim 

329 „ Bahadur Banda (Fort). General view 

33° I „ Another view 

33' Knmatilr (Medak) | Maajid, General view 

332 .. (Duplicate) 

333 Medak Fort, Carving* on the gateway 

334 - . Gateway, (root view 

333 - ~ „ General view 






6*% 4 r 



335" 



(Duplicate) 




Appendix E — contd. 



Sarla! No. 


Locality 


Devcfijtfca 


S4«* 


ij6 


Dithpalli <Ni*ima- 
btd). 


Temple. Carvings of the doorway 


6r-4r 


136- 


W 


99 #• 


9t 


33 6 * ' 


•9 


9W — 


99 


337 


H 


(( M&in doorwiT « • •• % • • 


99 


33* 


99 


„ View from S.W. 




33*" 


a* 


99 99 • • • • * 




339 


•• 


View from N.W. 




339- 


H 


N 99 • " •• •• • • 


*»' Mi- 


340 


N 


99 View from South 


n'- *r 


34* 


•V 


„ Vom of the shrine 


VmI* 


341- | 


M 


il 1 w 


•f 


34* 


H 4 ^ i 


li oCHItiaCI D fJlP 'iWBy a • e • • • 


•• 


343 


•• 


.* Pillar near the main doorway .. 


ft 


344 


- 


M Another pillar 


ft 


343 




„ (Detail). View from South 




346 


ft 


., „ View from Weat 


99 


347 


M 


Interior of the shrine . . . . \ 


6*--4** 


34* 


M 


„ General view from Weat .. .. | 




349 


KadU (Ninnali 


9* Sculptwo •• •• •• 1 


^'mI* 


350 


tt 


9 9 Sittif# 


«r»«r 


35* 


Tiimirni (Ninnali 


Tomb of Sbih Lulfollab .. .. ..1 


6*' -4** 


35* 


Bhainsa (Nanded) 


Temple near the tank. Canarcse inscription 


99 


333 


Biloli (Namjed) 


Mosque. General view . . . . . . . 


*i'*«i* 


354 


9* 


•• Facade (detail) 


99 


355 


9* 


H Inscription • • •• •• 1 


f 


356 


.. 


.. Lower part of the minaret 


*r-4r 


357 


ft 


- Pulpit .. 


M 


35* 


Aundah (Parbhani) 


Naglnatha temple and tank. General view 


*r-6j' 


359 


n 


i. General view • . • • 


tt 


360 


- 


„ Eastern side (detail) . . . . j 


9t 




2 * 



Appendix E— tondd. 



Serial No. 


Locality. 




Dompdoii 




Size. 


J 6 I 


Aundih (Patbhaai) 


! 

1 

s 

K 


• a 


»r* 6 r 


J 62 


M 


M 


Sikkdrt from East 




»» 


363 


n 


09 


„ (tom South • . . 


•• 


• I 


364 


at 


99 


Northern side (detail) 


• • . 


a# 


J 6 5 


w 


99 


Southern side (detail) 


• • 1 


11 


366 


•• 


00 


View (tom N W. 


• • 1 


91 


367 


99 


00 


View (torn East 


• e 


•• 


3M 


•• 


99 


Carvings o( the doorway 


• • 1 


<>*• - 4*- 


J69 


w 


99 


View (tom North 


• • 


»• 


37° 




99 


SUM from South (detail) 


9 9 


• • 


37« 

37* 


H 

#• 


99 


Flat o( the j>otch . . 
Pillar of the hall 


a a 

a a 


M 

99 

*»*»(.»' 


373 


»• 


99 


Doonray .. 


a a 


373- 


M 


" 


(Duplicate) 


a a 


1 1 


374 


MfthQr (fcfabdd) 


MawSU taa 


k. General view .. 


a a 


da 


375 


Hyderabad 


Toll Mas jut. General view 


a a 


6*' Ml* 


376 


•• 


1 .. 


(Duplicate) «. 


• a 


•a 


377 


M 


99 


Parade (detail) .. 


a a 




378 


I’ikbal (Waran*«l) 


Pikhal Uke inscription. 1st aide 


a a 


12* a IO* 


379 


99 


99 


•« 2 nd side 


a a 




38o 


99 


09 


.. 3 td side 


a a 


•» 


381 


M 


99 


- 4 th side 


a a 


a* 



26 

Appendix F. 



Lisi of j, ua nnt* prepared during the yetr—jlM October. igib. to bt M October, 1917 (1326 F-). 



Serial No. 


1 




ScAk. 


10 


Uparpalli (Karim- 
nagar). 


Plan of the temple 


• • • • 


• • 


6 ' to i‘ 


XI 


Hyderabad 


Plan o( the Toll Masjid 


.. 


• a 


8 ' to 1 ' 


12 


Mibur (Asifabad) 


Plan id the Cave temple* 




• a 


10 ’ to 1 


>3 


Aundih (Parbhanl) 


Plan at the Nlganitha temple 


.. 


• • 


io' to 1 


«4 


Mihur (Adfabid) 


Plan of the Hawaii tank 




• • 


40 ' to 1 


•5 


Riloli (.Sanded l 


Plan of the Masjid 




• • 


8 ' to X' 



Appendix G. 

Lift of utm squired during tke ycer 1916-17 <1116 F.). 

MOHAMMAD a III'MAyON RATHCAHl 





A H. 867-87. A.D. 1463-81. 




'total 

No. UM 


IXU. 




k * r *- 




{tela price. 


-K 












1 


• • 


. I* 


yL* ..y 


• • 


• a 






aa ■ 

sj~* 


cr 



















KRISHNA DHVA HAYA (V«.»»M«»r). 

A.D. 1509-30. 



N 

1-7 


• a 


.. Three- bae kgeod. (1) Sealed deity. 

$n I'rJU (2) p* 

Krishna (3) rty*. 


Half-pagodas. 


Rs. 6/- 
each. 


H 

8 


• • 


• • 0 1 " 


Pagoda. 


Rs. 10/* 






ACHYTJTA BATA (Vgayanagar). 










A.D. 1530-42- 






9 -“i 7 


• • 


.. Three-line legend (I) Double-beaded eagle- 
Sr% Prn ( t) UpackxnU monster (gunda 

(3) rty* boldin^up 


Half-pagodas 


Rs. 6,- 

each. 



26 



Appendix G — contd. 

bhJLh jabIs. 

A H. IOJ 7 - 68 . A.D. 16*8-58. 



1037 The Kalina and 



i*rv 






RiKht 

Bottom Maipaa 






n square the Kalina. „ 

Name* in mania* 
robbed away 

AUBAHOZEB. 

A.n. 1068-1118. A.D. 1658-1707; 



1 too 






I 


3* 




w-A r» **- 














•»* 




" 




M 


■xtr 17 


not 


•• 


89 


• • 


13 










•• 


•9 


•• 


riox 




*• 




34 


• ••• 


n- 




1102 


— 


09 




34 


• • -r 






1102 


»• 


•9 




35 




r# 




M 


» 


*» 


• 




27 



Appendix G — contd. 



M.t.1 

No. 


Mist. 


D*t«. 


obvtnt. 


JUvem. 


Remark*. 


.14 


Itawa 


uofc j4 ■*)?** ^2^)4 




t 

• • 


29 




39 




2. 












cfAr*"- 










a 4- 












**4*>ft 


** 




„ 


M 


1108 


M . 


aft 


• • 


3® 




3- 


||*A 


r 




„ 


M 


1113 


•• 


M 


• • 


3> 




43 


• l«r 


!*• 




•ft 

3* 


•• 


46 


99 


9ft 

n 


• • 


•• 


•• 


»«4 


•ft 


•• 


• • 


33 




46 


• nr 


n 




34 


•• 


*• 

47 


9ft 


- 

r* 


• • 










M 


•ft 


1116 


99 


•• 


• • 


33 

ft ft 


A A 


49 

ft A 


• m 


IM 

• • 


Datr ruhtttri 


• • 

36 


•• 

• 


• • 


9ft 




•way 


*• 


Ajtner 


1105 


99 




• • 


37 1 


Dam-1- 


• • * 


||ft# 


«-r* 




























H 


M 


xiofl 


9ft 






38 




• • 


II — 






" 


Ahsainabad 


x,, 5 


M 


Aa on No. SI. 


• • 


39 




47 


• IM 


(*» 
















! 

• • 


H 


1116 


— 


•9 




40 




48 


tin 






•• 

41 


V 


ft* 


•ft 

aV 0 -*' 


• • 


9* 

42 


•9 


• • 

3* 


•ft 


M 

ri 


• • 


• • 


Akbarabad 


1 • • 


•ft 




• • 


43 


Musi *- 






-r* 






eirru-l- 

Kbilatat. 






ad«> fi— 





Re. 1.8 
Re. 1/8 







Appendix G — contd. 



XUtil 



M 

44 



45 



•• 

V* 

•• 

47 

4» 

•• 

40 



M 

y> 

N 

5« 

»• 

5* 

•• 

53 

99 

54 



»* 

55 



Mini. 



RcmaiLa. 



Akbarabdd 
Mud*- 
qarru-l • 
Kiilahl. 



In square 

rr* 



In squate 

. >*** 

Maigin* : 

Uf t 

Top y~ Top 

Right *•»* 

DoltOBI 



Left 



v-rr 1 *- 



IMhaUd 

Bareli 



•• 



IIUO 

3* 

toy, 

3f 



HOI 

33 

1108 



no* 

4« 



As OB So. 21. 
but^TT -' 0 P»“* 
ol *>*}*• 



At oo No. 21. 
II** 



• •M 



II • I 

•# 

n*» 



cr*** 




AionNo. ji. 
*• *> 






•• 

«•! 



.. 1114 

47 

B i japCI r .. 
Dara-t- 31 

Zafr. 



.. no6 

3« 



!»• 



11-1 






r i 



J* 

HT* 

vv** 

s* y* w'A 





B 1 j a p a r 1 106 
DOiu-i- J 9 
£afr. , 



As on No. 2i 



^ U 

w*,4 



Tatta 



r* 

At on No. 21. 



Jahangir- to., 
uagar. 28 



idaratud. mo 
Dirut- 43 



/'/A- 



If 


•• 


1 »««M 

M 


•• 

1 1 oJ# 






>7 




j7 


' * *T 




•* 


•• 


•• 


IUI 


• t 




•# 


bo 




44 


III! 




** 


<T« 


if 


• • 

47 


H 




•• 


•» 

M 


OUnapaU 


n 

41 


— 




•* 

••1 



***** 

pt 

'- r ^/ 

*«> y. 



The regnal 
year it on 
the obverse 
and the 



*•/'• year 
00 the re- 



On the ob- 
verse after 
the figures 
tll 6 the 
letter • 
is written. 



Sflrat 1077 As on No at. 

9 Date to left of middle 
line. 



-•y 1 * 

/ r 

-r* 



Re. 1/8 




Appendix G — contd 



Mo. 


Mint- 


Due. 


ObTcne. 


— 


Remark*. 


Sal* price. 


M 


Surat 


1082 


A* 00 No. 21. 




Rvgn&l year 




68 




«4 


Dale to left o< middle 




cut. 










line. 

1 -»r 
















~ir- 














rr* 






•• 






00 


9 * 


• 0 


Re. 1/8 


60 




»4 




1* 






M 


M 


• • 


*0 


«• 


• • 


Re. 1/8 


70 




• 41 » 










M 


0* 


I o 1 ** 


00 


09 


• • 


a • 


7 « 




ao 










•• 


• 9 


«**9 


00 


•• 


Ha* several 


Re. 1/8 


7 * 




31 


f •*« 


*• 


punch mark* 


' 


II 

7 J 


• 0 


- 




•• 


Date in top 
line. 


a 0 












90 


00 


10,0 


#• 




a 0 


0 0 


74 




23 




UO 1 * »* •*- 




















• • 


• 9 




1 re 


M 


0 0 


Re. 1/8 
each 


75-76 


*• 


33 

IOQI 




ff 




00 

77 




•• 


0# 

,r 


9 9 


0 0 


7 * 


•• 


TOOI 


9 * 


.. 


Date in top 


0 0 




J 4 




n* 


line 




»0 




M 


99 


9 « 


• 0 


Re. 1/8 


79-8° 












each 


0* 




1002 


99 


- 


a 0 


0 a 


8 l 




J 4 


• •If 








„ 


00 


1093 


0* 


•9 


.. 


0 0 


82 




*5 




r# 






00 


09 


•0 


09 


•0 


• • 


Rc. 1/8 


*3-*4 


■ 










each. 


00 


0* 


1093 


- 


•* 


a 0 


0 0 


85 








M 






»0 


M 


•0 


9* 


•0 


a a 


Re. 1/8 


86-87 












each. 


IV 


0* 


1094 


00 


90 


a a 


.. 


88 




*7 




ff 







Appendix Q contd. 



Metal 

No. 


Mini. 1 


Daw. 


ObWfK. 


— 

R*«0<»00 


Rem^b. 


suwp.« 


& 


SQrat 


IO95 


- — ■ 
As on Ko .*6. 


As 00 So. 74. 






8 9 




27 


• •is 


r» 








0# 


„ 


00 






Re. 1/8 


90 














»» 


„ 


1095 ! 


M 


•0 


•0 


• • 


91 




a 




r« 






9 » : 


M 


■ 3 s : 


00 

• •n 


r* 


• • 


a a 


•• 


» 


•• 


•0 


„ 


• • 


Re. i/ia 


93 














H 


• 


1097 


to 


00 


• • 


• 0 


94 




29 


• •it 


•• 


a ■ 


Re. 1/8 


93*97 


M 


•• 


00 






each. 




I* 


1097 

30 




• « 


•• 


• • 


98 




I'M 


r* 






M 


M 


,09* 


00 


•0 


• 0 


• • 


99 




30 






















Kc 1/8 


100-103 


II 




** *Tjf 






each. 


» 


1# 


l<» 9 « 


•0 




• • 


• 0 


104 




31 




ri 




• a 


.03 


H 


*'"#9 

3 « 


M 


•0 




» — 


„ 


00 


1101 


M 


00 


0 • 


0 0 


106 




33 


00*0 


rr 






•9 


•0 


1100 


B 


00 


0 0 


• 0 


lo 7 




34 


0 0-0 


n* 






9* 




®0 


„ 






Re. 1/4 


108-109 












each. 


00 


00 


1103 


09 


f0 


• • 


0 • 


no 




35 


IIT 


r« 






a> 


•0 


09 




00 


• • 


Re. 1/8 


ni-113 












each. 


•• 


00 


II04 


90 


•0 


, , 


•• 






36 


11-^ 


r«i 






» 


•» 


00 


00 






Re. 1/8 


,, 5 














1 16 


01 


• • 
38 


00 


00 

r* 


" 


L_ 







32 



Appendix C. -«mtd 



Metal 

Six 


Mint 


luxe. 


Obverse. 


Reverse. 


Remarks 


Salt price 


M. 


Surat 




As 00 No. 66. 


As on No. 74. 




Rc. 1/4 


ll 7 




38 




TA 




»• 

_ rt 


.. 


1107 


99 


M 


• • 


. a 


Il8 




39 




TK 






M 






ff 






Rc. 1,8 


110-121 












each. 


H 

122 


•• 


* 


" 


„ 


• a 


• • 


H 




KUO 


If 


•a 


.. 


.. 


iaj 




4 * 


• It* 








M 


• i 


1110 


N 


•% 


• • 


.. 


U 4 




43 


1 


if 






I* 




•• 


. 






Re. 1,8 


I 25 -*» 




■ ^ 




| 




each 


M 




m2 


A a 








127 




u d 


a • • 

• iff 








II 




HU 


• • 


1 ** 




1 f • 


128 




45 




- 






M 




»n 


•• 


.. 


• • 


• a 


**> 

H 


•• 


4® 

7 4 


Mir 

99 


-t 






no 




• Iff* 


•• 






«ji i 




• • 

47 


M 


*• 






!• 


#• 


m6 


•• 


99 


•• 


• a 


» 3 * 




4 * 


tin 


!>• 






II 




1116 


M 


99 


f • 


• • 


>33 




40 ^ 










H 






M 




Date nibbed 


Re. 1/4 


> 34-43 








•* 


away. 


each. 


If 


Sahrind 


II09 


As on No. 21. 


As on No. ft. 


Mint name 


Re. 1/4 


144 


(?) 


41 , 


§••1 


IM 


cut. 












v 'f- 














(?) 






*• 


Sb'hiaban- 


IOQ 4 


# • 


& *U •_•»*> yj 


• • 




145 


ahad 

ni, 


2f> 




•r* 

^^4- 0^. __,U 














M *»- 






M 

* 




1007 


Pf 




• • 


• • 


t 4 6 




30 


t.sv 


r« 








33 



Appendix G — conti . 



u.' 

No. 


Mlrt 


Date. 


Obmw. 




Renarkt 


.« 


Sbahjaban- 


IO 97 


A» OQ No 21. 


it, ^ |U UUA ,1 j 




147 


abad 


1 


%•%¥ 


-r» 






Diru-l- 

Kkityai. 






-•*•«« wrpW 

r- aw 




M 


tv 


II 07 


99 


- 


* * 


«4« 




39 


n.. 


n 




W 


99 


H 


99 


99 


a • 


149 




4*> 










•9 


• • 


„ 


99 


THX* cut. 1 


w-v 












" 


Sfeolipar 


lO^O 


99 


Aa on No. II. 


•• 






ai 




ri 












*** 




M 




M 


9* 


•9 


Krtenal yctr 


>33 










cut. 






IOQ7 


a* 


aa 


■a# 






10 




r* 




II 


Kalak 


, , 


99 


a# 


9 9 


•53 




44 




1*7 

Off 




II 


II 


N 


•» 


•9 


Name of mint 


iy> 


■ — 

IT 1 . " .a 


— 






cut. 


*37 


Kaiphayat 


1093 

*3 


I>*t* • 9% r in bottom 


99 


• • 








In. 






•• 


99 


•* 


*» 


99 


a a 


■sa 




aft 1 








„ 


11 


•• 


99 


•• 


a a 


>59 




28 




M 




•1 


•r 


1098 


Aa on No. at ; but date 


•• 


.. 


Ifto 


~ , 


30 ] 


1 . la ia bottom line. 


P. 




161 


M 1 


1103 

3l5l 


*9 

Ilf 


- 

p r*l 


• • 


ifa 


99 


U 07 




•• 


•• 




39 


II-. 


M 




W 


a a 


1110 


99 


#• 




163 


v m 


43 


Ml* 


■ 

9P 




99 

164 


99 


47 


»* 


99 

1 ** 


•• 



Sato price. 



Re. 1/8 



Re. 1/4 
each. 



Re. i ,i8 



Re. 1,4 




84 



Appendix G — < onid . 



MtUI v . , 

Xo. Miot 


Date. 


Obrtne. 


— 


Remarks 


S*J« price. 


.* 

165 


Gulkanda 

(Golconda) 


• • l 

14 I 


At on No. ai ; bat datr 
l‘U in bottom line. 


As oq No. ax. 

1 * 

•Ator 


•• 


•• 


M 

166 


M 


• • 

ax l 


•• 


r", 






«*7 


•• 


• • 1 

26 


99 


- 

M 


• • 


• • 


168 


M 


3 ® 


99 


M 

*• 


•• 




II 

169 


•• 


40 f 


- 


•• 


• 0 


• • 


IP 

x 7 o 

A A 


T 4 hor 

Da/u-i- 

Sa/fanst 


T 

TQM 


i*V 


»•» 
n **- 


A A 


• • 
• • 


** 

* 7 * 


99 


ST | 


paaowa ^ 4 

!•« 


•4 

rv 


• • 




•» 

17a 


•• 


io<>6 

*9 


!•« 


rt 


• • 


• • 


« 

173 


•1 


r too 

33 




rr 


*• 




174 | 


Ukhna'd 


1075 

*7 


» 


As on No. 21 

rv 


• • 


•• 
















»i 

175 


MacbMp*- 

tan. 

(Masulipa* 

tarn). 


tioo 

33 


Data M- - in topline 


rr *i- 

vr* 


. . . 


• • 


176 


M 


ma 

.. I 


.HP 


•• 


R renal year 
ctn 


• • 


'77 


MulfcSn 


1098 

30 


9 t 

• •la 


As oc No. at. 
f 


• • 


• • 


178 


MailapQr 


in* 

5 ' 


MM 


•• 

•• 

V 


Rare. See 
Plate XIII 


• • 


'79 


Nusrata- 

bad. 

(?) 


• • 

X 


•• 


*rr* 

1*3 

(?) 


• • 


• • 




36 



Appendix G — contd . 



Mo. 


Mint. 


Date 


Obraic. 


— 


Recur k*. 


Sale pricr. 


M 

i«o 


•• 


5 


As oa No. 21. 


As on No. 21. 

• 


• • 


1 


181-82 


• • 


l * * 

6 


•• 


•* 


•• 


Re 1/4 
each. 


•• 

«*3 




■ • I 

9 


•• 

Bui in place of 

/***• 


*-t 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


>*4 


” 


12 


#9 

But >- in place of 


As 00 No. 179. 

ir 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


i *5 


• • 


• • 

*5 


An on No 21 . 


As oa No. 31. 
1 r 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


ife 


• • 


• • 

*5 


• • 

But ** in plan of 


As oa No. 183. 
U 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


1*7 




10 *7 
*0 


. 5 * on No at; but date 
«... in bottom line. 


As on No at. 
M 


• • 


R*. 1/4 


M 

18A 




• • 

91 




•• 

ri 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


1*0 


• • 


• • 

aa 


But in pi net of 


As 00 No. 183. 

r* 


• • 


R«. 1/4 


100 


• • 


1090 

*3 


As on No. at. 


As oa No. 91 . 

rr 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


191 


• • 


1091 

34 


• "ll 


•• 

n* 


.. 


Re. r/8 


iga 


* • 


109a 

34 


i.tr 


r# 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


* 93-04 


•• 


26 


*» 


•* 

M 


• • 


Re. x /4 
each 


*• 

*95 


•• 


• • 

26 


*7 

But in place of 


Aft on No 183 
M 


.. 


Re. 1/4 


*<* 


•• 


*7 




•* 

" ! 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


»» 

*97 


•• 


1098 

30 


As on No. 31. 
ft* 


As oq No. 21. 

r* 


• • 


Re. 1/4 





86 



Appendix G — contd . 



Metal 

No. 


Ml*t- 


Date. 


— 


— 


Rcnoiki. 


I 

Sale price. 


M 

198 


• * 


1099 

3 * 


As on No. 11. 
• •1* 


As on No. 21. 
r ' 


•• 


Re. 1/4 


«99 


•• 


• • 

3 « 


As on No. 195. 


As on No. 183. 

1*1 


• 0 


Re. 1/4 


•» 

200 


• • 


1099 

3 » 


As on No. 11. 
I*«« 


As on No. 11. 


0 • 


Re. 1/4 




• • 


1100 

3 * 


- 

• I- 


| " I 


•• 


Re. 1/4 


202-03 


a 

• • 


IIOI 

33 


•a 


rr 


•• 


Re 1/4 
each. 


•a 


• • 


• • I 

33 | 


But jt** ff* in pine* oi 


As on No. 183. 


• • 


Re. «/4 


105-06 




IIOI 

u 


A* 00 No. it 
tltf 


As cm No. 21. 

n* 


• # 


Re. 1/4 
each. 


• 07-09 

•a 




IIOI 

34 

V IfU 


•# 

• ••r 




a a 


Re 1/4 

each. 
Re. 1/4 


2 I 0 -II 




3 ? 




•• 


a a 


each. 


M 

212-13 


• • 


1105 

37 

a a I 

37 


ft a# 


£ 


a a 


Re. 1/4 
each. 


« 4 -«S 

/ 




r- *" place of 


A* on No. 183. 
r* 


*• 


Re. 1/4 
each. 


216-18 




3 * 


M 


r* 


a a 


Re. «/4 
each. 


•a 

119 


• • 


•i 


As on No ll. 


As 00 No. 2T. 

r* 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


H 

220 


• • 


1106 

39 


IM 


•• 

r* 


a • 


Re. 1/4 


at 

221 


• • 


1107 

-39 


•• 

II** 


• 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


at 

222 




39 


As on No. 21: but 
instead of 


As on No. 183. 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


at 

223 




1109 

41 


As on No. 21. 
Date ||«1 in last Une. 


As on No. 21 . 

n 




Re. 1/8 


at 

224 




•• 


Date ll*« in top Hoe. 


** 


■ • 


Re. 1/8 



37 



Appendix G — could 



VWtAl 

No. 

• 


Mint. 


Dote. 


Obetne. 


RCTCTSC. 


Remirb. 


S«l* pn« 


At 


• • 


I IZO 


As on No. ai. 


As oa No. 21. 




Re. 1/4 


223-26 




4 * 


Ill* 


tf 




each. 


99 




rm 








Re x /4 


227-28 






nil 


fr 




each 


„ 




ina 


M 


99 




Re. 1/4 


229-32 




44 


tiff 


l 9 » 




each. 


99 


.. 


• • 




As on No. 183. 


• 9 


Re. 1/4 


*33 




44 




PP 






•» 


.. 


m3 


M 


99 


• • 


Re. 1/4 


* 34-35 




45 


IIIP 


pa 




each. 


99 




1*14 


m 


A* on No. 21. 


• • 


Re. 1/8 


*36 




4 ° 


IMP 






•• 


• • 


•• 


O 


•• 


• • 


Re. 1/8 


*37 




47 










* 38-39 


.. 


IMS 


99 


It 


• • 


Re. x/8 




47 


III* 






each. 


•• 




<1 


99 


9 


.. Rc. 1/8 


240-41 




48 

***6 

48 


■ 


p» 


each. 


* 4*-43 


• • 


•* 

1119 


99 


.. Rc. 1/8 

each. 


244-46 


•• 


1117 


„ 




.. Rc. 1/8 




49 


III* 




each 


M 


•• I 


*1*8 


0# 




.. Rc. 1/8 


247-48 




5 * 


III* 


•1 


««cb. 








kAm bai 


*H8H. 










A. II. 1119-1120. 


A.D. 1707-08. 




.. 


Haidar*- < 


1120 


•**•« — 




Rare. See 


a • 


*49 


b ad. 


2 






PUlc XIII. 










*• 


r vp**- 












iip* 


—r* 



































Bniii 



A.H. 1119-24. A.D. 1707-12. 



. 


‘Xlamgfr- 1 


1119 






Lesend* very 


250 


pflr. 


1 




distinct. 












See Plate 
XIII. 








MM *Jj»“ 









Appendix G — contd. 

jahaxdab snin 

A.H- > 124 - A.D. 1712. 



~m 

Meta! 

No. 


Mint. 


D*U. 


Ofrrene. 




I 

Remart. 


M 

*51 




1 


... rfA 

Pft** ^2; T- 


— 

u-* 1 **^ **- 
vr* 


Mint name 
cut. 



KAKBUKUSIYAR. 

A . 11 . 1124-31. A.D. 1713-19. 



Hnwa 



252 



*31 



*51 



*33 



«».»o 

7 



AkbarabAd 



n»reii 



BuihanpUr 1130 
256 Da r 11 - 1 - ' 6 
Snrllr. 



*57 ' 

• • 

* 5 * 



(i*) 



1130 

7 



2*- t/**-^* 









J.i-Reuds a 
little rob- 
bed away. 
Mint name 
cut. 

Lc«end» very 
distinct. 



I.eReuda a 
little rub- 
bed away. 



15 > *) 



iit •+“ f t>» JA*? A* 00 No. 252. but mint 
at Bareli. 



A* on No. 253. 




JJiy 

v » O 



err' 1 ' 




On the rcvcrec 
after 

there is a 
word which 
is cut. The 
mint may 
be 

Cf. White- 



Salt price. 



Ke. I/S 



Re. 1/8 



Re. 1/8 



Re. 1/8 




Appendix G — contd. 



Uetil 

So. 


Mini. DM*. 


ObTOTC- 


Rmne. 


RcmaiU 


Sole pile*. 


M 

*59 


Sdrat 

5 


As OD So. 25S. 


As 00 So* 258. 
Mint Surat (?). 


•• 


Kt. 1/8 


260 


" 


•• 


Mint name distinct. 




Re. 1/8 


II 

a6i 


II 1 II 


99 


99 


• • 


Rc. 1/8 


>9 

*62 


II II 


99 


•» 


• • 


Re. 1/8 


*3 


n 6 3 ° 


I'P* 


99 


legend* very 
dear. 


• e 


* 


■ae- v 


At «m No. 254. 




• a 


Rc. 1/8 


v 


19 99 


Aj OO No. 253. 


-'■A 

99 




Re. 1/8 


263 




1 / (TT'i * 








2bb 


a 


At oo No. 258. 


As 00 So. 13a* 

r 


• • 


Rc. 1/8 



A.H. irji. A n. 1719. 



„ Sflrat nil 

*67 <?> 1 



I in 

j, tJ ~ \ r 



' rt *~ 



Mint aaiue 
cal. 



< 1 >* 

MUHAMMAD MI A II 

A.H. IIJI-61. A.D. 1719-48. 



26S 


Itawa 


It.. 

a 


il(rr» 


«**- 


Same of mint 
slightly cut. 


Re. i,'8 






















f 


-r* 




















If 


Ahma.lafoM 


ii*. 


•9 


99 


*• 


Re. 1/8 


26g 


it) 






II 

(?) ^ *»*• 






99 


Arlcat 


• • 




9 # 


Legend* 


Re. i,8 


270 




5 




• 


dightly rob- 
bed away. 




IB 


99 


1 a • 








Re. 1/8 






6 










BB 


f9 


IX.. 




99 


1 

0 

1 


Re. 1/12 


272 




20 











40 



Appendix G — «mtd. 



Metal 

No. 


Mat 


I 


Obrcne. 




Remark*. 


K 

*73 


Arkat 


25 I 
(?) 


•u 

* 




Name of mint 
cut. 


•• 

*74 


I 


"i 




M 

m 


legend* di* 
tinct 














n 

*75 


1* 


”57 

• • 


ll** 


•• 


• • 


27 * 


H 


If.. 

3 <> 


** «( 


M 

r* 


•• 


>i 

277 


It 


•• 


A. oo No. 273. 


As 00 No. 273. 


Name o( kin, 
robbed 












■w»y 




AktwraWd 


• • 


•• 


*-fi 


• • 


27s 


“SB. 






^yt. vr* 




279 


Tdmon 

(?) 


II.. 

22 


•• 


As on No. 2*8. 

It 

T/W 


Mint is new. 
Sec Plate 
XIII. 


•• 

280 


Sflmt 


II 3 -. 

2 


M 


- 

f 


•• 










*;r- 




281 


8* 


It.. 

5 


M 


*• 

• 


•• 


M 

282 


It 


11.. 

5 


As on No. 268. 


As 00 No. 268 
• 9 P* 


Regnal year a 
little indis- 
tinct. 


**3 


>• 


IX. . 
6 


t# 


•0 


•• 


M 

*»•» 


SbSlijahan- 

■hod. 


”33 

3 


P lUjt |U *.«> 1 irr 


. 4,1 ^ ^ *•>*>, U 


Letters a 
little rub- 
bed away. 










r8- 




») 

28 5 


*• 


”37 

7 


- 

1 ir» 


■ 1 

V 


Date in se- 
cond line, 



Sal* price. 
Re. 1/8 

Re. 1/8 
Re. i/ia 
Rc. 1/8 

Re. i m 

• • 

Rc. i/ia 

Re. l/ia 
Re. 1/8 

Rc i/8 







Metal 

No 



Mint. 



Date. 



fi — contd. 





42 

Appendix G —contd. 



Metal 

No. 


Mist 


Dote. 


O brwne. 




Rmne 


Remarks. 


Sale price 


.* 




1 •• 


As 00 No. 268. 




As 00 No 268. 




Re. 1/8 


2<» 




a 






r 






9; 






•9 




M 




Re. i,'8 


300 




3 






r 






m 


.. 


I • • I 


99 




•9 




Re. 1* 


301 




5 






• 






*• 




i.3« 


•9 




99 




Re. 1/8 


30a 






MW 










•4 




1140 


■ 




9* 


• 9 


Re. 1/8 


303 




10 






f • 






99 






„ 




„ 


# 9 


Re. 1/8 


3«M 




*3 






•r 






„ 


• • 


114.. 


•* 




44 


# # 


Re. 1/8 


3°3 




18 


III*.- 




•• 






*• _ 


• • 


.. 


99 






9 • 


Re. 1/8 


306 














• 


99 




1150 


49 




99 


• • 


Re. 1/8 


307 




ao 


• ••* 




r* 










T It 








• 9 


Re. 1/8 


y* 




1 • 

•• 1 


4* 

• M... 




44 




H 


• • 


113.. 


49 




•4 




Re. 1/8 


309 

A 


A ft 


*4 


• M 

■■ 


T 


r* 

•• 


• # 


Re. 1/8 


w 

310 


• • 




■9 




F* 






9# 


• • 


• • I 


99 




99 


• 9 


Re. 1/8 


3« 




30 






r« 








• 9 


1 • • 1 


it 




•9 




Re. 1/8 


3*a-*3 






— 








each. 








A«fMAD 811 All. 










AH. 1161-47. 


A.D. 1748-54 




99 


Arkat 


1 •• . 


.... 






ThcA.fr. date 


• 9 


3*4 




1 


|U9mI 




^->4 >»* **- 












>U|U^ 
















X- f 




**> 






















99 


*4 


1 • • 


99 




99 


• • 


•• 


3*5 




2 






f 






3*6 


99 


3 


49 




99 

r 


, ' r f en . d * very 

distinct. 


•• 



Appendix G — contd . 



Metal 

No 


Hta«- 


D*te. 




— 


— * 


Sale price. 


M 

3*7 


Arkit 


• • 

4 


AlUjL 

A- 


c-**- 

-Af“* 

rr* 


► 


Ra. 3 /. 


M 

31* 


•• 


1164 

4 


•9 

II V 


99 

!• 


•• 


•• 


3*9 


M 


4 


- 


99 


Name of king 
cut. 


Ra. 4 /- 


it 

3*0 


•9 


(n 6 h 

3 




99 

• 


a • 


a • 


£ 


99 


•• 

5 




99 

• 


u str 


Ra. 6 /. 


tt 

jaa 


M 


• • 1 

5 


1 M 

•• 


H 

4 


•• 


R*. it- 












Sc* Plat* XI 1 1 




•• 

3*3 


• t 


I iro 

6 


mV 


•9 




a a 


la 


• I 


.«66 


40 


■■ 


,, 


Ra. 6 /■ 


144 




6 


fit* 


ea 

* 




it 

3*3 


•• 


I «67 

7 ! 


*• 

in* 


» 

V •• 

V 


U E&T 


•• 


3*6 


99 


• • I 


at 


99 


• t 


R». 3/- 


» 

3*7 


»9 


• • I 


99 


flt 


Name of mint 
cot. 


Ra. a /• 


II 

3 *« 

3*9 


SOrat 

(?) 


• • I 

(«' 6 P> 

6 1 


Ai 00 No. 314. 
[M1]1 


Aa on No. 314. 

(?) 

•9 


Name of mint 
cut 

Mint name 
cot. bat it 
is probably 
Arkat. 


Re. x /8 
Ra. a/- 


330 


•• 


l**6]7 . 

7 


Cini* 


•9 

V 

24 


• • 

TK« r<»nt>U 4 /mi 


Ra. a/- 


** ! 


(cS^U) 


I IDO 

a a 


im 

~ l H 


••if 


1 tic couplet on 
the obverse 
is different 
from that 
given in 
PunjabMu- 
seam Cata- 
logue. p. 
359 See 
Plate XIII. 


a a 



44 



APPENDIX G — tonid. 

IlamoTb n. 



AH. 1167-73- A.D. 1754-59 



Metd 

No. 


Mini. 


Date. 




Rererw 


R*tn*rk* 


Sale price. 


M 


Arkat 


u6(7) 






The coin was 


Re. i V 


532-337 




X 




struck by 


each. 












the French 
East India 












-*/ 


Company , 




99 


•» 


r, 7l x I 


#• 


if 


M 


Re 1/8 


33*-339 




4 




•* 




each 


M 


99 






ft 


„ 


• # 


340 




5 




• 






M 


Imtiyi* 




U 




Rare. Sec 


* • 


34 « 


att* 








Plate XIII. 










•* *mh 






342-43 


•V 

1 


M 1 


•• 


•# 


" " 


Ra. to/- 
each. 












M 




M I 


M 


M 


Legend* a 


R* y/- 


344-345 


1 








Uttle rub- 
bed away, 




346 


H 


• • 


*• 






" 










•a*** 






II 


.. 


116.. 


• • • • 




The mint 


Re. 1/8 


347-353 




• • 


» A 


name seem* 


each 










r*wraV in 


to be new. 










■ » 


V 














*uU... 

r 







8HAH Ai.au II. 

A.H. 1173-1*31. A.D. 1739-1806. 



at 


1 186 [ J>.*i 




Mint name 


Re. 1/4 


354 




• 1*1 


cut. The 








a a a a 


coin be- 
long* to a 






1 




Deccan 

mint 




M 


• • • * As 00 No. 354 ; but the 


urP*- 


Letters of the 


Re. i/- 


355 


word distinct 




reverse rubb- 






in last line. 


... •*- 


ed away. 




H 


1 .. 1 a* 


^r 


The arrange- 
ment of lc- 


Re. 1/8 


356-57 














gends is 
rather un- 










usual. 






*5 



Appe*tdix G — condd 

SHAH ‘ALA 1C II. HDSill ‘ALl KHAN (of £aldarabM . 

A.H. 1173- 1221. A.D. I73 ^-iSo 6. AJI 1176-1218. A D. 1763-1803. 



-Vo. 


Mini. Dm*. 


0 >»ttnr 


Rif—. 

— 


Remark.. 


S^tprto* 




Narayan- . 1186 
pet 


>* * 

* 


IM1 


Kaiayanpet 
aicva See 
Plate XIII 


•* 


15 <H* | 


•t I •• 




99 


•V 


" 


Re. 1 '8 
e#ch. 




PHOTOGRAPHS AND DRAWINGS 





Ml-slJM MONUMENTS* 



Plate I. 



iQvr* SHAHI ATO Mr^fVAL 




m«r 







I> n^J» 09 rmw n»m« mi trnvau 'K»i4^.oi* 





11 -ATI IV. 

HINDU MONUMENTS* 

iMiMiiTti r*woo». 





7 






PlatxIX 







Pl*AT * 









n-.rr XII.